Daily (?) Captain Cox — “Doctor Boords Breviary of Health”

PEDIGREE:   When I did a search on EEBO for this book written by Andrew Boorde, six colophons returned, three of which were for printings before 1575:

–Imprynted at London in Fletestrete at the sygne of the George next to saynt Dunstones churche : By Wylllyam Myddelton, In the yere of our Lorde M.CCCCC.xlvii [1547], the xv. daye of July.
–[The breuiary of healthe, for all maner of syckenesses and diseases the which may be in man or woman, doth folowe. Expressynge the obscure termes of Greke, Araby, Latyn, and Barbary, in English concernyng phisicke and chierurgerie, compyled by Andrewe Boorde, of phisycke doctoure, an Englishe man]. , [Imprynted at London : In Fletestrete by Wyllyam Powell, Anno. 1557].
Date: 1557
(This one has only two surviving pages…)

–The breuiary of healthe, for all maner of sicknesses and diseases the which may be in man or woman, doth followe Expressyng the obscure termes of Greke, Araby, Latyn, and Barbary, in Englishe concernyng phisicke and chierurgerie, compyled by Andrewe Boorde, or phisicke Doctour, an Englishe man. , [Imprinted at London : In Fletestrete at the signe of the George next to saynt Dunstones Church by Wyllyam Powell], Anno. MD.LII. [1552]]
Date: 1552

Frederick Furnivall had, himself, published long extracts from the “Breviary” along with commentary, sometime before he wrote “Captain Cox: His Ballads and Books”.     He refers the reader to that earlier work, which contains the “Breviary” extracts along with other works, including the interestingly-named “Barnes in the Defense of the Berde (Beard)”, a literary “answer” to “The Boke of Berdes”.

 

SYNOPSIS:      This is meant to be an overview of health, humours, and illness, with the illnesses listed in alphabetical order by their Latin names.    The tone is, at times, anecdotal and personal rather than detached or clinical–in his collection, Furnivall reprints such passages, including one titled “Boorde hates water, but likes good Ale and Wine”.    Boorde is said to have written the “Breviary” as a companion piece to his earlier “Dyetary of Health”, which Furnivall transcribed in its entirety.

Dr. Boorde was at least well known enough in his day to have works attributed to him with dubious real connection.    “The Mery Tales of the Mad Men of Gotam” is attributed to “A.B.,  Physicke Doctor”

AVAILABILITY:  Two of the three holdings listed from EEBO above have images of complete books, the 1547 and 1552 printings.   If one has access to EEBO.

Furnivall’s  book with extracts of the “Breviary” is on the Internet Archive:

http://archive.org/details/fyrstbokeintrod01boorgoog

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