Daily (Captain) Cox–“The King and the Tanner”

Pedigree:   Mr. Furnivall mentions three editions of the same basic tale.     The first, with no known surviving copy, printed (by one William Greffeth) early enough to appear in the “Stationers’ Register A”   (the Worshipful Company of Stationers was first chartered in 1557).     Another printing  (by John Danter) dates to 1596, the copy Bishop Percy (of the Percy Folio) reprinted, along with the Stationers’ Register extract.      Furnivall wrote that “Percy cooked (it) sadly in his “Reliques” “, by which I infer that Percy may have  altered what he read, to an indeterminate degree.  Furnivall also refers to a much later ballad titled “The King and the Barker”.

 

Synopsis:    Greffeth’s version was titled “the story of Kynge henry the iiij and the Tanner of tamworth”.      Danter’s, “a merry, pleasant and delectable history between King Edward the Fourth and a Tanner of Tamworth”.    The king meets a tanner (with a load of hides), and decides to have sport with him. Unaware that he is speaking to his King, the tanner makes free with his speech, calls the stranger a spendthrift at one point and a thief at another.     The king offers to trade horses with the tanner, with calamitous results for the tanner, who tries to improvise a saddle with one of his unprocessed hides.      The tanner does not realize who is pranking him until the King’s men arrive and kneel before him, and after the tanner is suitably repentant, the King grants him largesse and they part in friendly fashion.

 

Google Books has a copy of Percy’s book (the only version I can find online) here:

books.google.com/books?id=mR5LAAAAcAAJ

Internet Archive’s copy is here:

http://archive.org/details/percysreliquesof01percuoft

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: